Spirituality and intoxicants I am grateful that Dr Rapiti recognises that while we may differ on the approach, in principle we share a mutual concern for the addict, the affected family and society in general. I am also thankful that Dr Rapiti raised the value of spirituality in any healing process. In my opinion those who advocate for the legalisation of drugs have a peripheral outlook on the entirety of the problem. While I concede that the legalisation of some drugs could help manage some criminal aspects, what is unfortunatly overlooked are the countless harmful agenda’s that addiction serves. When the legalisation debate ensues self-styled experts casually compare local addicts to those in Europe. They forget that Europe is first world and the local addict’s situation is third world. A person who compares Manenberg and Nyanga to the coffee shops of Amsterdam must be on drugs. Are these experts proposing that we build coffee shops in Manenberg or invite Nyanga’s addicts to the coffee shops in the city? I am also intrigued by those who speak of Cape Town as a world class African city yet look to Europe for solutions as if history, culture, socialization and economics are immaterial. According to Max du Preez “The rootlessness of coloured people, this sense they got over centuries of not belonging, is the only reason why gangsterism is so rife in that community. Gangsterism is almost a yearning for a tribe, an attempt to belong”. Do European addicts have similar problems? Also it is important to know that the injuries caused by addiction are not new evils. Throughout history, humans have been plagued by similar evils. This includes amongst many others, pleasure seeking, self-indulgence, corruption, an inability to reason, cruelty and violence. These evils are enhanced when using intoxicants. The Torah, the Bible and the Quraan speak much about all these isSpirituality and intoxicants I am grateful that Dr Rapiti recognises that while we may differ on the approach, in principle we share a mutual concern for the addict, the affected family and society in general. I am also thankful that Dr Rapiti raised the value of spirituality in any healing process. In my opinion those who advocate for the legalisation of drugs have a peripheral outlook on the entirety of the problem. While I concede that the legalisation of some drugs could help manage some criminal aspects, what is unfortunatly overlooked are the countless harmful agenda’s that addiction serves. When the legalisation debate ensues self-styled experts casually compare local addicts to those in Europe. They forget that Europe is first world and the local addict’s situation is third world. A person who compares Manenberg and Nyanga to the coffee shops of Amsterdam must be on drugs. Are these experts proposing that we build coffee shops in Manenberg or invite Nyanga’s addicts to the coffee shops in the city? I am also intrigued by those who speak of Cape Town as a world class African city yet look to Europe for solutions as if history, culture, socialization and economics are immaterial. According to Max du Preez “The rootlessness of coloured people, this sense they got over centuries of not belonging, is the only reason why gangsterism is so rife in that community. Gangsterism is almost a yearning for a tribe, an attempt to belong”. Do European addicts have similar problems? Also it is important to know that the injuries caused by addiction are not new evils. Throughout history, humans have been plagued by similar evils. This includes amongst many others, pleasure seeking, self-indulgence, corruption, an inability to reason, cruelty and violence. These evils are enhanced when using intoxicants. The Torah, the Bible and the Quraan speak much about all these issues since the God worshipped by Abraham send numerous emissaries to warn against the abuse of intoxicants. The difference between the intoxicants of biblical times and that available today is that the modern drugSpirituality and intoxicants I am grateful that Dr Rapiti recognises that while we may differ on the approach, in principle we share a mutual concern for the addict, the affected family and society in general. I am also thankful that Dr Rapiti raised the value of spirituality in any healing process. In my opinion those who advocate for the legalisation of drugs have a peripheral outlook on the entirety of the problem. While I concede that the legalisation of some drugs could help manage some criminal aspects, what is unfortunatly overlooked are the countless harmful agenda’s that addiction serves. When the legalisation debate ensues self-styled experts casually compare local addicts to those in Europe. They forget that Europe is first world and the local addict’s situation is third world. A person who compares Manenberg and Nyanga to the coffee shops of Amsterdam must be on drugs. Are these experts proposing that we build coffee shops in Manenberg or invite Nyanga’s addicts to the coffee shops in the city? I am also intrigued by those who speak of Cape Town as a world class African city yet look to Europe for solutions as if history, culture, socialization and economics are immaterial. According to Max du Preez “The rootlessness of coloured people, this sense they got over centuries of not belonging, is the only reason why gangsterism is so rife in that community. Gangsterism is almost a yearning for a tribe, an attempt to belong”. Do European addicts have similar problems? Also it is important to know that the injuries caused by addiction are not new evils. Throughout history, humans have been plagued by similar evils. This includes amongst many others, pleasure seeking, self-indulgence, corruption, an inability to reason, cruelty and violence. These evils are enhanced when using intoxicants. The Torah, the Bible and the Quraan speak much about all these issues since the God worshipped by Abraham send numerous emissaries to warn against the abuse of intoxicants. The difference between the intoxicants of biblical times and that available today is that the modern drugs are strategically designed by experts to rapidly hook and transform the addict. This alteration from a human to a monster allows the addict to rape babies, children and often their own mothers. Historically all prophets have spoken about this loss of humanness. According to Islamic scholars, a human has the qualities to rise above the level of an angel but also has the ability to fall beneath the level of an animal. Not even an animal will rape a baby. Therefore when a mother elects to murder her addict child can we imagine what that child must have done? In my opinion, the addict’s transformation is not accidental; it is part of more sinister project. Hardened addicts often speak of seeing things which are not visible to a normal person. Therapists describe this as a type of mental illness; those conversant with spiritual matters have a very different explanation. Addiction is not merely about criminality; addiction is about the loss of humanity. Those who design and sell drugs are at war with our humanity. When a person rapes and murders without a conscious, their humanity is absent, that is why the death penalty is divinely ordained and necessary. To save our collective humanity those who enable evil must be sacrificed. Cllr Yagyah Adams Cape Muslim Congress s are strategically designed by experts to rapidly hook and transform the addict. This alteration from a human to a monster allows the addict to rape babies, children and often their own mothers. Historically all prophets have spoken about this loss of humanness. According to Islamic scholars, a human has the qualities to rise above the level of an angel but also has the ability to fall beneath the level of an animal. Not even an animal will rape a baby. Therefore when a mother elects to murder her addict child can we imagine what that child must have done? In my opinion, the addict’s transformation is not accidental; it is part of more sinister project. Hardened addicts often speak of seeing things which are not visible to a normal person. Therapists describe this as a type of mental illness; those conversant with spiritual matters have a very different explanation. Addiction is not merely about criminality; addiction is about the loss of humanity. Those who design and sell drugs are at war with our humanity. When a person rapes and murders without a conscious, their humanity is absent, that is why the death penalty is divinely ordained and necessary. To save our collective humanity those who enable evil must be sacrificed. Cllr Yagyah Adams Cape Muslim Congress sues since the God worshipped by Abraham send numerous emissaries to warn against the abuse of intoxicants. The difference between the intoxicants of biblical times and that available today is that the modern drugs are strategically designed by experts to rapidly hook and transform the addict. This alteration from a human to a monster allows the addict to rape babies, children and often their own mothers. Historically all prophets have spoken about this loss of humanness. According to Islamic scholars, a human has the qualities to rise above the level of an angel but also has the ability to fall beneath the level of an animal. Not even an animal will rape a baby. Therefore when a mother elects to murder her addict child can we imagine what that child must have done? In my opinion, the addict’s transformation is not accidental; it is part of more sinister project. Hardened addicts often speak of seeing things which are not visible to a normal person. Therapists describe this as a type of mental illness; those conversant with spiritual matters have a very different explanation. Addiction is not merely about criminality; addiction is about the loss of humanity. Those who design and sell drugs are at war with our humanity. When a person rapes and murders without a conscious, their humanity is absent, that is why the death penalty is divinely ordained and necessary. To save our collective humanity those who enable evil must be sacrificed. Cllr Yagyah Adams Cape Muslim Congress