Military coups are wrong The African Union and South Africa should be commended for their disapproval of the military coup d’état in Egypt. That President Morsi was elected via a democratic process cannot be repudiated. If Morsi’s election is ignored then future democratic standards across Africa is equally threatened. Africans must accept the importance and outcomes of free and democratic elections. Africans must accept that an administration, no matter how ineffective, can only be removed through a democratic process. Egyptian opposition and military leaders must be indicted for crimes against humanity since they plotted this unlawful coup. They must be liable for the chaos and deaths that have taken place. Military leaders across Africa must believe that there will be individual costs to their actions and that Africans will not tolerate military intervention in civil society disputes. The AU should also examine the role of secret societies attached to western states that have historically sponsored the Egyptian military. The AU should hold the coup leaders responsible for the extraordinary arrest of members of the Muslim Brotherhood. On what legal principal can military and opposition leaders arrest members of a democratically elected governing party? This deed is judicially intolerable and cannot be allowed. If the AU does nothing to halt these catastrophic events in Egypt, can we imagine what will happen across Africa every time some critics and military leaders decide to overthrow an elected President? The millions who voted President Morsi into authority cannot be overruled by a few thousand activists. If this coup is popular, then locals should seriously re-valuate their thoughts on the thousands of service delivery protests that occur annually in South Africa. Capetonians must be vocal in their criticism of such undemocratic activities as it affects us directly. African leaders must be made to behave maturely or face severe penalties for their misconduct. Whenever African politicians cause problems in their countries then millions of their citizens are displaced, many move to Cape Town. With the continuous existence of violent xenophobia, Capetonians cannot afford to welcome another wave of displaced refugees. Cllr Yagyah Adams Cape Muslim Congress