When I have time to exercise, which at times includes a run across town, I wear less formal attire. When this occurs, building security usually asks for identification. When dressed formally, security rarely asks for ID. The point is, we all judge others on criterion depending on our values. While this may not be righteous, humans are inherently flawed and this behaviour will not readily change.

Centuries ago, Muhammed the emissary related a story of a suffering dog at a drinking well. A prostitute saw the dog and drew water in her shoe allowing the dog to drink. The Creator saw the action of the prostitute and pardoned her historic sins because of her kindness towards the thirsty dog.

Lessons to be learned from the narrative include that no-one is that perfect that we cannot fail and also no-one is that flawed that we cannot receive redemption. Another lesson is that the Creator’s mercy is so vast that the human mind cannot comprehend the entirety of the Creators compassion.

On the flip side of the above, on a regular basis when it suits them, senior political leaders publically ask religious leaders to pray for them. While this is good request, the problem is that often the same leaders are unwilling to change their behaviour and linger purposely upon the path of generalise ruin. 

The point is, it is abnormal to ask others to pray for you but you are unwilling to remedy your corrupt, obstructive behaviour. Thus while the Creator is most gracious most merciful, this does not imply that we can take this mercy for a joke or use it expediently. While it may seem as if you are winning by fooling some of the people some of the time, fooling all the people all of the time is not possible.

While judging others may not be entirely righteous, it is your fault if you invite calamity on yourself by not modifying your conduct and generally taking people for a joke who depend on your leadership.

Cllr Yagyah Adams

Cape Muslim Congress